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"Certified nutritionist"?

Home forums Patient Message Board "Certified nutritionist"?

Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
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  • #2660
    tahoedonner
    Member

    What is a “certified nutritionist”? I checked the State of California (where I live) WEB site and could find no mentions of any State certifcation requirement for “nutritionists”.

    I also searched the WEB for certification programs for “nutritionists” and found quite a few (one at only $99 for a corrispondence course) and several that seemed to be of similar quality.

    Is there any acceptable certification authority out there for “certified nutritionists” or can just anyone hang out a shingle and reap in the big bucks? Or is it just the old “caveat emptor” thing?

    #2661
    czaring
    Member

    Tahoe … found this in case you didn’t. It could either add to or diminish somewhat your satisfaction in making your point ….. it’s not much …..

    Why don’t YOU become one?? You seem like you’d be great 😉 … it’s obvious you are enthused …. and it looks like you could be rolling by Flag Day!!

    http://www.nyu.edu/cas/prehealth/path.htm#DI

    Dietician (Nutritionist)
    “Dieticians and nutritionists use their knowledge of the principles of nutrition to help people develop healthy eating habits” (Careers for the 90’s, 1991, Research and Education Association). Nutritionists and dieticians plan nutrition programs and supervise the preparation and serving of meals for such institutions as schools, hospitals, hotel chains, and prisons. They help prevent and treat conditions such as hypertension and obesity by promoting healthy eating habits.
    To become a registered dietician, you must complete an academic program and a clinical training component of roughly half a year’s duration before sitting for the registration exam. There are several different ways in which you can complete the requirements to become an RD; for a student with a BA degree, however, earning a master’s degree in nutrition appears to be the most sensible approach.

    Requirements:
    Students must be well grounded in biology, chemistry, physiology, and computer applications, as well as social sciences.
    NYU Contact:
    Department of Nutrition
    NYU School of Education
    35 West 4th Street, Suite 1201
    New York, NY 10003
    Tel: (212) 998-5580

    For further information:
    American Dietetic Association
    216 West Jackson Boulevard
    Suite 800, Chicago, lL 60606-6995
    Tel: (800) 877-1600 wink wink

    #2662
    czaring
    Member

    Welcome to the Web site of the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR), the credentialing agency for the American Dietetic Association.

    Tahoe … check out the websites of the

    ADA,
    CRD as well as CADE

    CADE (see below)

    The Commission on Accreditation for Dietetics Education is ADA’s accrediting agency for education programs preparing students for careers as registered dietitians or dietetics technicians.

    #2663
    Terri
    Member

    Tah, If you do not believe in Nutrition or Nutritionist what type of treatment are you doing for this dreadful disease, You don’t seem to share any of your experiences on the Disease or your treatments, just seem to Give advice or comments on things other people are doing.
    And no matter what It is helping us, so sorry that I disagree with you. I am grateful to those forum members that are sharing their treatments, experiences since I have learned so much from

    #2664
    John in GR
    Member

    Hi Tah,

    I haven’t been checking the forum too much lately due to the unexpected passing of my brother who was also my friend and law partner on Nov 28th.

    As usual I can’t resist the opportunity to respond to your very outspoken but sometimes misguided comments. I do, however, very much enjoy reviewing your comments which are so critical of my position which is that people ought to be considering the use of nutritional and alternative therapies since the conventional ones usually don’t work for MDS and because nutritional therapies have only good side effects. I believe that if I am truly comfortable with my position, I should not be upset by those who have a different perspective. I hope you feel the same way.

    Like you, I am skeptical about accepting the validity of nutritionists based solely on credentials. In fact, I’m not using one. My program is based on my own independent study and networking w a variety of individuals.

    The other side of the coin, however, is that I am also very skeptical of those highly educated, impeccably licensed individuals who pass off poisons and dangerous toxic substances as helpful when they often do not extend life and only insure that the remaining time will be spent feeling weak and sick.

    How about you, Tah, are you also skeptical of conventional medicine??? Are you willing to ask the hard questions of conventional medicine???

    Yes, I believe that caveat emptor (let the buyer beware) should apply to nutritional and alternative approaches. But I also believe that medical consumer should also be fully informed about the conventional approaches–bad and good.

    Have you been reading the news lately about all the about all the supposedly benign drugs that are now being pulled from the shelves because these treatments, sometimes for conditions the person would recover from anyway, are now confirmed to be very harmful??????????

    We are far too quick to give up on our body’s recuperative powers even from serious illness IF we give our bodies the care it needs to operate at peak efficiency.

    For those of you who are new to the forum, you might want to check out my story and treatment protocol at http://www.geocities.com/marlakins/index.html

    John

    #2665
    mommachkate
    Member

    Hi John,Exellent answer,agree with you 100%. I read your story. My husband has CMML. I wish he would listen to me, conserning the alternative treatments, but he won’t. Kate

    #2666
    Bob P
    Member

    Hi John,
    I’m very sorry to hear of the sudden loss of your Brother. Those are the hardest to take and adjust to.

    I don’t always agree with your philosophy of treatment but I must complement you on your letter writing. You use words so well to describe your thoughts. If ever I needed an attorneys letter I would hope to find one who is as good as you in writing it.

    Bob…

    #2667
    Terri
    Member

    Again John, Thanks for the support, As you know we are using both approaches the conventional as well as the advice of our nutritionist. I think from Prior Post Tah is just not using any treatment conventional or alternative. I feel my husband is too young just to wait for the disease to take him.

    #2668
    tahoedonner
    Member

    Hi John….

    I think that we agree far more than we disagree.
    I am very wary re Vidaza. I tried it for one week and because I had a very bad reaction that week and the next, I stopped taking it. I know that it was approved based on very small numbers. It may work well for some, but I would like to see some better indication that the good effects outweigh the bad, before I try it again.

    I went into remission (maybe the Vidaza did it) and have had fairly normal counts as of late. My MD would like me to try Vidaza again at half the dose if my numbers turn bad particularly the platelets, since Vidaza is known to lower them at first. I’ll think about it.

    Re alternative medicine, I am also wary. I do believe in keeping to a good well balanced diet, not smoking,not overdoing alcohol, exercising (well somewhat)and all that stuff, but I don’t believe that if a little spinach is good for me, a lot must be better, and I don’t believe that the teen aged clerk at the local high priced “health food” store has some Chinese herb or Swedish wonder drug that is going to cure my MDS.

    I have a relative who must belong to “The Disease of the Month Club.” She listens to health food radio programs and buys all that they have to offer. This puts her on sucker mailing lists for yet more stuff, which she also buys. Her home is full of this stuff since she can’t consume it as fast as they keep sending on standing orders. She also has an ever growing library of books (that she hasn’t time to read) that tout this stuff. She’ll probably buy the best seller “Eats Shoots and Leaves” thinking it’s about health food! Luckily, she can afford all this stuff. We just hope that none of it is going to do her in!

    Glad to read that you think that I am only “somewhat misguided”!

    #2669
    sarah
    Member

    Tahoedonner, was curious what your fairly normal counts are?

    #2670
    Jimbob
    Member

    Interesting, the local chapter of the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society here in Portland OR is having a major patient education program this Saturday to explain the following:
    “Using Natural Medicines in Combination with Chemotherapy”
    “The role of Naturapathic Medicine in the Treatment of Cancer”,
    “Acupunture and Chemotherapy”,
    “Mind/Body Practices for Cancer Patients”, and “Health and Energy Dynamics”
    Looks like more and more conventional medical providers are opening up more and more to alternative and comlimentary possibilities.
    Jim

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